Tag Archives: Lantus

Thoughts on an Untreated Type 2 Diabetic

Staged medical clinic at the Bonneville County Jail, Idaho Falls, Idaho. (The “patient” is actually one of the medical staff)

We recently had a 46-year-old male patient booked into our jail who reported a history of diabetes but who had not seen a physician or taken any medications for “years.”  He said he used to take a medication for diabetes “a long time ago” but he could not remember the name.  He also could not remember the name of the doctor he had once seen.  He reported basically no other medical history. Continue reading

Diabetic Case Studies–The Insulin Rules in Action!

People come to jail taking the weirdest insulin regimens.  Often times, I don’t know whether these insulin schems are the result of a practitioner who does not understand insulin dosing well, or whether the patient “tinker” with their insulin dosing, themselves.  Here is a case from one my jails  (I have changed some of the data and patient characteristics to protect patient privacy).

English: C. H. Best and F. G. Banting ca. 1924

Banting and Best, Discoverers of insulin

A type 1 diabetic comes to jail taking Lantus 15 units in the morning and 40 units in the evening.  He says he takes his Humalog on a sliding scale, but when asked to define exactly what the parameters of his sliding scale are, it becomes apparent that he basically decides his Humalog dose based on gut-feeling.  He may take nothing; he may take up to 15 units.  He certainly has no concept of counting carbs.  He thinks his average Humalog dose is 6 units.  His admission HbA1C is 12.8, or an average blood sugar of over 300.  In other words, he is not doing a very good job of controlling his blood sugars on the outside.

Anyway, let’s apply the rules of insulin dosing to this patient: Continue reading

Insulin Dosing Made Simple

I have found, in my years of practicing correctional medicine, that few practitioners who come to corrections are comfortable with insulin dosing. In my experience, this is especially true for physician assistants and nurse practitioners, but many physicians have problems, too. Insulin dosing can be complicated and tricky at times, but for most patients, 10 simple rules will get you to where you need to be.

We first need to cover some groundwork and some terms. Insulin terminology can be confusing. First, it is very important to remember that this discussion applies to type 1 diabetics only. Type 2 diabetics sometimes use insulin, but that’s a “whole ‘nother ballgame.”

Continue reading