Recent Entries

Prescribing Without an Exam?

2019-11-14 12:48:59 jeffk2996

The State Board of Medicine in my home state recently sent out a bulletin about the practice of "friendly prescribing" to people who the practitioner has not examined.  For example, a friend might call me and say something like “I have a sore throat.  Will you call me in a prescription for antibiotics?”  I’m sure that almost everyone who has practiced medicine has received such phone calls!  The Board of Medicine was concerned about this. They went so far as to to condemn as unethical the practice of issuing such prescriptions without ever examining the patient or documenting the encounter.

In my opinion, this applies to correctional physicians prescribing to new inmates they have never seen, as well.

Examining a patient through the phone.
Posted in: EditorialLegal mattersMedical PracticeUncategorizedTagged in: ethicsinmatesJailMedicinejailsJeffrey Kellerprisons Read more... 1 comment

When Should Medical Clearance Be Done? PLUS Sample Guideline!

2019-10-24 20:50:46 jeffk2996

When arresting officers arrive with their charges at a certain large urban jail, the first person they see when they come through the doors is a nurse. The nurse quickly evaluates the arrested person to determine whether a medical clearance is needed before the person can be booked. If a clearance is needed, the arresting officer has to transport the prisoner to a local ER and then return with the medical clearance in hand.

One evening (so the story goes), an arresting officer arrives at the jail bodily dragging a prisoner through the pre-book door by the backseat of his pants and coat. "This guy's an a**hole," the officer says. "He won't do anything I ask. He just ignores me." He then dumps the prisoner on the floor. The nurse kneels down by the prisoner briefly, looks up and says, "That's because he's dead!"

Medical clearances are a hugely important and often neglected part of the jail medical process.

Posted in: EditorialGuidelineInmate issuesLegal mattersMedical PracticeUncategorizedTagged in: evidence based medicineinmatesjailsJeffrey KellerMedical Clearanceprisons Read more... 1 comment

Words Matter. "Inmate" or "Patient?"

2019-10-01 14:07:38 jeffk2996

Words matter.  What we write about our patients in our medical notes to a great degree reflects how we feel about them. Our words also mold our future relationship with our patients. One good example cited by Jayshil Patel, MD in a recent JAMA editorial (found here) is the common phrase “the patient was a poor historian.” There may be many reasons why a patient is not able to answer our questions well, such as dementia, delirium or psychosis.  In fact, the inability to present a cogent narrative usually is an important symptom of an underlying condition.  “Poor historian” does not reflect this fact.  To the contrary, “poor historian” implies that the patient is at fault for my poor documentation, not me!  “Poor historian” leaves out that there are other ways for me to get a medical history (medical records, talking to family, etc).  “Poor historian” also implies that the patient was deliberately not cooperative—even though perhaps I spent maybe two minutes attempting to get a history.

Many other common medical phrases also subtly disparage patients. Two good examples are the words “denies” and “admits” as in: “The patient denies drinking” or “the patient admits to IV heroin use.”  The implication of these words is that we are engaged in something akin to a hostile cross examination where I forced the patient to “admit” (against their will) to drinking and I really don't believe the patient who “denies drug use.” Words guide how we think about our patients, even if on a subconscious basis.    When I use these words, I am saying that my patient and I are not on the same team.

In corrections, perhaps the single best example of a word that negatively influences our relationship with our patients is “inmate.”

Posted in: EditorialInmate issuesJail cultureLanguageUncategorizedTagged in: inmatesJailMedicinejailsJeffrey Kellerprisons Read more... 3 comments

Do You Understand the Requirements for Multiple DEA Licenses?

2019-09-17 12:46:03 jeffk2996

I have found that many correctional practitioners, especially in jails, do not understand the license requirements of the federal Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) and, as a result, do not have all of the DEA licenses that they are legally obligated to obtain. 

Take, for example, a correctional physician that we will call Dr. K who is employed full time a a large urban jail and has had a DEA license for that jail for many years.  On the side, she also provides medical services to three other smaller jails, where she does clinics once a week. The question is whether her one DEA license covers her activities at the other jails.  Dr. K has always thought that she only needs one DEA license—just like she only needs one Driver’s License—and it will cover all of her activities. 

But the real answer is, “No,” Dr. K is not in compliance with DEA regulations.

Posted in: EditorialLegal mattersMedical PracticePractice ManagementUncategorizedTagged in: correctional medicineevidence based medicineinmatesJailMedicinejailsJeffrey Kellerprisons Read more... 1 comment

Constipation Plus Sample Guideline

2019-09-16 06:00:36 jeffk2996

Today’s post is a repost of an article I wrote previously about Constipation. Concurrent with this article, I have added a Sample Guideline on Constipation to the Guideline Section of JailMedicine (found here).

I have decided after many years of dealing with complaints of constipation both in the ER and in correctional facilities that bowel health is the last taboo subject.  We all received “The Talk” (about sex and reproductive health) when we were adolescents.  But nobody seems to talk about how to have a proper bowel movement.  It is a subject that inevitably causes giggling and uncomfortable laughter.  It is not spoken of in polite society.  As a result, many people do not understand how their bowels work.  I have found this to be a big problem in the jails I work in.  Inmates complain of constipation when they are not really constipated.  They are bowel-fixated when there is no reason for them to be.  Often, they need education more than they need laxatives. To this end, I want to discuss several essential factors relating to understanding and treating constipation that may help make your correctional medicine practice a little easier.

Posted in: Drug EvaluationsEditorialGastroenterologyGuidelineHomepageMedical PracticeUncategorizedTagged in: Constipationevidence based medicineinmatesJailMedicineJeffrey Kellerprisons Read more... 0 comments

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